--Advertisement--
Ad by The Cutting Edge News

The Cutting Edge

Thursday July 20 2017 reaching 1.4 million monthly
--Advertisement--
Ad by The Cutting Edge News

The Trump Era

Back

Untangling U.S. Foreign Policy

April 15th 2017

Truman Bldg/State Dept HQ

American geopoliticians in the 100 years the U.S. was coming of age as the superpower had the "luxury" of facing a relatively monolithic enemy. From the early 30s, it was fascism dominated by Mussolini and then Hitler until his downfall at the conclusion of World War II. Stalin and his worldwide Communist apparatus moved into that role in the immediate postwar period.

It was only with the implosion of the Soviet Union in 1990 that Washington planners faced what had been the more normal historical array of a number of powerful national and imperial entities vying for power. Turning their hand to this complex has confronted American policymakers - however the disproportionate size and power of their country - with new and perplexing conflicting interests.
Nowhere is that problem more apparent than with Washington's relations with the Russians. The muddled argument now taking place in the public arena is only the most obvious expression of this.

Vladimir Putin's success at accumulating near-dictatorial powers, his potential to employ the former Soviet Union's reservoir of weapons of mass destruction including hydrogen bombs, give him heft that has to be considered beyond the crippled power and condition of his country.

Especially is that true because he has sought to wield it against his neighbors and former Soviet appendages Georgia and Ukraine, threatening Poland and the Baltic States. The U.S. and its European allies in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization could not ignore what was again a threat to peace by an aggressive neighbor, seeking as Putin has, the reconstruction of the foreign Russian Empire/Soviet Union.

If Putin does not aim at the superpower status of the former Soviet Union - although not nominally a Communist, he said "the breakup of the Soviet Union was the greatest geopolitical tragedy of the 20th century" - he had the power to disrupt the peace and stability of the post-Soviet world.

Washington does not find it easy to deal with Putin's Russia which in some parts of the world over which the U.S. still has the obligations of the principal, and at times, only, peacekeeper. It must oppose and lead an alliance against Moscow in Putin's efforts to move back to the Communist/Imperial western borders. But in the critical Syrian civil war - with its growing foreign participation - Washington seeks to oust the Basher Al Assad government which Moscow supports although both find a common enemy in the ISIS Moslem terrorists who are the chief opponent of the Basher regime.
This leads to tactical contradictions such as U.S. bombing of Russian forces supporting the Damascus government, Washington's chief enemy in the region and perhaps now the world.

In Western Europe, Washington's half-century of backing the economic and political integration of the continent as a solution to its centuries of internecine warfare - which twice within the century have drawn in the U.S. - is collapsing. The withdrawal of Britain and its attempt now to boost its commercial and political relations with the U.S. and the English-speaking former Dominions, resurrects the old dilemma - what to do about a Germany that overwhelms its traditional enemy France, flirts with the Russians, and is dismayed by its power.

In Asia, the U.S. has the prospect of an increasingly powerful and aggressive China which threatens to dominate both Japan and manipulates the two Koreans, menacing the most important sea lane in the world through Southeast Asia. A short-term U.S.commercial policy toward China that has been a net transfer of resources through below-cost pricing is now reaching its climax, but having destroyed much of the American manufacturing base on which the new digital revolution must build a completely new concept of production.

Washington is faced with the prospect of increasing its expensive buildup in East Asia or encouraging Japan and South Korea to adopt nuclear weapons in their defense.

The Trump Administration - a rogue if powerful political force built on the resentment of a large part of the population outside the three elitist urban centers - may be blessed with a certain naïve vitality. But it has only a short time for it and its successors to create a new U.S. approach to world diplomacy.


Back
Copyright © 2007-2017The Cutting Edge News About Us