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Ancient Edge

If the Fabled Atlantis Was Destroyed by a Tsunami, Has it Finally Yielded its Secrets

March 14th 2011

Archaeology Topics - Atlantis ancient walls
Ancient walls off the coast of Spain

A U.S.-led research team may have finally located the lost city of Atlantis, the legendary metropolis believed swamped by a tsunami thousands of years ago in mud flats in southern Spain.

A new National Geographic Channel documentary, Finding Atlantis, followed a team of US, Canadian, and Spanish scientists as they employed advanced remote-sensing and other technology paired with underwater archeology and historical sleuthing in an effort to find a lost civilization. Led by University of Hartford professor and archaeologist Richard Freund, the team has been surveying marshlands in Spain to look for proof of the ancient city. If the team can match geological formations to descriptions left by the Greek philosopher Plato and date artifacts back to the time of Atlantis, we may be closer to solving one of the world's greatest mysteries. Read more ..


Edge on the Environment

Over-Fishing of Predator Fish Causes Domination by Smaller Fish

March 7th 2011

Animals - Tuna haul

By 2050, small fish could dominate the oceans because of the rapid decline of larger, predator fish.

In a new report, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization finds that one-third of the world’s fisheries are overexploited, depleted or recovering and in urgent need of rebuilding. At a recent meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Washington, University of British Columbia fisheries expert Villy Christensen predicted the eventual preponderance of small fish.

Twenty years ago, Christensen designed a computer tool called Ecopath to study complex marine ecosystems. Now Ecopath has 6,000 users in 155 countries. Read more ..


The Nano Edge

Researchers Introduce First Complete Millimetre-Scale Computing System

February 28th 2011

Science - UM nano-pressure monitor

A prototype implantable eye pressure monitor for glaucoma patients is believed to contain the first complete millimeter-scale computing system.

And a compact radio that needs no tuning to find the right frequency could be a key enabler to organizing millimeter-scale systems into wireless sensor networks. These networks could one day track pollution, monitor structural integrity, perform surveillance, or make virtually any object smart and trackable.

Both developments at the University of Michigan are significant milestones in the march toward millimeter-scale computing, believed to be the next electronics frontier.

Researchers presented papers at the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) in San Francisco. The work is being led by three faculty members in the University of Michigan Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science: professors Dennis Sylvester and David Blaauw, and assistant professor David Wentzloff. Read more ..


Edge of Life

Canadian Researcher Lists More than 4,000 Components of Blood Chemistry

February 28th 2011

Science - University of Alberta blood research

After three years of exhaustive analysis led by a University of Alberta researcher, the list of known compounds in human blood has exploded from just a handful to more than 4,000.

"Right now a medical doctor analyzing the blood of an ailing patient looks at something like 10 to 20 chemicals," said U of A biochemist David Wishart. "We've identified 4,229 blood chemicals that doctors can potentially look at to diagnose and treat health problems." Read more ..


Edge on Biology

Scientists Reveal Secret of Migrating Sea Turtles

February 28th 2011

Science - Sea turtle brains
Central nervous system of Tritonia diomedea

From the very first moments of life, hatchling loggerhead sea turtles have an arduous task. They must embark on a transoceanic migration, swimming from the Florida coast eastward to the North Atlantic and then gradually migrating over the course of several years before returning again to North American shores. Now, researchers have figured out how the young turtles find their way.

"One of the great mysteries of animal behavior is how migratory animals can navigate in the open ocean, where there are no visual landmarks," said Kenneth Lohmann of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

"The most difficult part of open-sea navigation is determining longitude or east-west position. It took human navigators centuries to figure out how to determine longitude on their long-distance voyages," added Nathan Putman, a graduate student in Lohmann's lab and lead author of the study. "This study shows, for the first time, how an animal does this." Read more ..


The Race for Hydrogen

Mimicking Photosynthesis Path to Solar-derived Hydrogen Fuel

February 21st 2011

Energy / Environment - Hydrogen fueling

Inexpensive hydrogen for automotive or jet fuel may be possible by mimicking photosynthesis, according to a Penn State materials chemist, but a number of problems need to be solved first.

"We are focused on the hardest way to make fuel," said Thomas Mallouk, Evan Pugh Professor of Materials Chemistry and Physics. "We are creating an artificial system that mimics photosynthesis, but it will be practical only when it is as cheap as gasoline or jet fuel." Read more ..


Edge of Life

Research on Fertility Yields Unexpected Rewards

February 21st 2011

Social Topics - Pregnant

When Prof. Nava Dekel of the Weizmann Institute of Science’s Department of Biological Regulation began studying a protein that plays a role in implanting fertilized ova in the uterus, she had no idea it would lead to a discovery that is now helping couples struggling with infertility to have children.

For many years, Prof. Dekel focused her investigations on the mechanisms responsible for ovum (egg) development and embryo implantation. “But in science,” she says, “you can never decide ‘this is what I’m going to study for the rest of my life.’ You follow a path, and somewhere along the way you say, ‘Wow—there’s something interesting!’” Read more ..


The Nano Edge

Researchers Produce Graphene Sheets from Sugar at Low Process Temperatures

February 21st 2011

Science - Sugar graphene

Rice University researchers have learned to make pristine sheets of graphene, the one-atom-thick form of carbon, from plain table sugar and other carbon-based substances. They do so in a one-step process at temperatures low enough to make graphene easy to manufacture. The lab of Rice chemist James Tour reported that large-area, high-quality graphene can be grown from a number of carbon sources at temperatures as low as 800 degrees Celsius (1,472 F). As hot as that may seem, the difference between running a furnace at 800 and 1,000 degrees Celsius is significant, Tour said. Read more ..


Edge on Light

Jewel-toned Organic Phosphorescent Crystals Become New Class of Light-emitting Materials

February 21st 2011

Science - aromatic carbonyls
Credit: Marcin Szczepanski, U-M College of Engineering

Pure organic compounds that glow in jewel tones could potentially lead to cheaper, more efficient and flexible display screens, among other applications. University of Michigan researcher Jinsang Kim and his colleagues have developed a new class of material that shines with phosphorescence—a property that has previously been seen only in non-organic compounds or organometallics.

Kim and his colleagues made metal-free organic crystals that are white in visible light and radiate blue, green, yellow and orange when triggered by ultraviolet light. By changing the materials' chemical composition, the researchers can make them emit different colors. Read more ..


The Geologic Edge

Scientists Map Out the Advance of the Ice Age in Britain

February 14th 2011

Environment Topics - Siberian Glacier

Led by Professor Chris Clark from the University of Sheffield´s Department of Geography, a team of experts developed the maps to understand what effect the current shrinking of ice sheets in parts of the Antarctic and Greenland will have on the speed of sea level rise.

The unique maps record the pattern and speed of shrinkage of the large ice sheet that covered the British Isles during the last Ice Age, approximately 20,000 years ago. The sheet, which subsumed most of Britain, Ireland and the North Sea, had an ice volume sufficient to raise global sea level by around 2.5 meters when it melted. Read more ..


Edge on the Environment

Depletion of Arctic Fisheries 75 Times Higher than Previous Reports Suggested

February 14th 2011

Environment Topics - Greenpeace cod protester

University of British Columbia researchers estimate that fisheries catches in the Arctic totaled 950,000 tonnes from 1950 to 2006, almost 75 times the amount reported to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) during this period.

Led by Prof. Daniel Pauly, the research team from UBC’s Fisheries Centre and Dept. of Earth and Ocean Sciences reconstructed fisheries catch data from various sources—including limited governmental reports and anthropological records of indigenous population activities—for FAO’s Fisheries Statistical Area 18, which covers arctic coastal areas in northern Siberia (Russia), Arctic Alaska (the U.S.) and the Canadian Arctic.

The Arctic is one of the last and most extensive ocean wilderness areas in the world. The extent of the sea ice in the region has declined in recent years due to climate change, raising concerns over loss of biodiversity as well as the expansion of industrial fisheries into this area. Read more ..


Edge on the Universe

New Computer Simulations Give New Insights into the Birth of Stars

February 6th 2011

Science - Stellar formation-Corona Australis

The first stars in the universe were not as solitary as previously thought. In fact, they could have formed alongside numerous companions when the gas disks that surrounded them broke up during formation, giving birth to sibling stars in the fragments. These are the findings of studies performed with the aid of computer simulations by researchers at Heidelberg University’s Centre for Astronomy together with colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching and the University of Texas at Austin. The group’s findings, being published in Science magazine, cast an entirely new light on the formation of the first stars after the Big Bang. Read more ..


Google on Edge

GOP Could Make Trouble for Google

February 6th 2011

Obama Admin Topics - Obama_Google
Fortune Cover, Nov 9, 2009

Saddled with the perception that it is a darling of the Obama administration, Google may have it tough with Republicans. The company whose chief executive campaigned for President Obama stands to become a target of investigations by multiple committees. Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), who has promised to be an aggressive watchdog as chairman of the House Oversight Committee, has led congressional Republicans in questioning whether Google has inappropriate ties to the Obama administration.

Issa wrote to the White House in April to ask whether a technology official and former Google employee had unethical contact with the company. “The American people have a right to expect that White House employees are working to advance the public interest and not the interests of the lobby shops who formerly employed them,” Issa said in the letter.His spokesman, Seamus Kraft, said the committee “will continue to be concerned about consumer privacy issues and the Presidential Records Act.” Both issues directly affect Google.

Watchdogs have also questioned Google’s ties to Democrats. The pro-free-market group National Legal and Policy Center, for example, has labeled the company the Halliburton of the Obama years. Halliburton was closely associated with the administration of President George W. Bush. Read more ..


Warfare Edge

Israeli Scientists Develop Crucial Enzymes to Protect US Troops from Nerve Gas Attacks

February 6th 2011

Military - Nerve gas drill

Protection against nerve gas attack is a significant component of the defense system of many countries around the world. Nerve gases are used by armies and terrorist organizations, and constitute a threat to both the military and civilian populations, but existing drug solutions against them have limited efficiency.

A multidisciplinary team of scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science succeeded in developing an enzyme that breaks down such organophosphorus nerve agents efficiently before damage to nerves and muscles is caused. Their results have been published, while recent experiments performed in a U.S. military laboratory (the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, or USAMRICD) have shown that injecting a relatively small amount of this enzyme into animals provides protection against certain types of nerve agents, for which current treatments show limited efficacy. Read more ..


The Edge of the Universe

Scientists Discover Ejected Solar Materials Resembling Clouds in Earth’s Atmosphere

February 6th 2011

Science - Sun ejecta

Physicists, led by a researcher at the University of Warwick, studying new images of clouds of material exploding from the Sun have spotted instabilities forming in that exploding cloud that are similar to those seen in clouds in Earth’s atmosphere. 

These  results could greatly assist physicists trying to understand and predict our Solar System’s “weather.”

The researchers, led by of the Centre for Fusion Space and Astrophysics, at the the UK’s University of Warwick’s Department of Physics, made their discovery when examining new images  of clouds of material exploding from the Sun known as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). These images were  provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) experiment on NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). SDO was been launched last year and provides unprecedented views of the Sun in multiple temperatures. Read more ..


Oceans on the Edge

NOAA Moves to Police Seas

January 30th 2011

Environment Topics - NOAA HQ

As part of their continuing effort to take a lead in managing global fisheries, officials with the U.S. National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration told Congress earlier this month that they’ll work with six countries – singled-out for their lack of enforcement—to cut down on illegal fishing around the globe.

A NOAA taskforce identified vessels in Colombia, Ecuador, Italy, Panama, Portugal, and Venezuela for illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing, or IUU. Most infractions were for fishing out of season or without proper registration, but in one instance driftnets were used illegally by an Italian vessel to catch 24 eastern Atlantic bluefin tuna—20 of them under the legal catch size—in the summer of 2009. Read more ..


Edge on Maternity

Israeli Scientists Find a Link Between Antioxidants and Female Infertility

January 24th 2011

Social Topics - Pregnant

Antioxidants are sold over the counter everywhere. They’re added to food, drink, and face cream. But according to Prof. Nava Dekel of the Weizmann Institute of Science’s Department of Biological Regulation, we still don’t have a complete understanding of how they act in our bodies. New research by Prof. Dekel and her Israeli team, recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), has revealed an unexpected possible side effect of antioxidants: they might cause fertility problems in females.

Common antioxidants include vitamins C and E. These work by eliminating molecules called reactive oxygen species that are produced naturally in the body. Stress can cause these chemically active molecules to be overproduced; in large amounts they damage cells indiscriminately. By neutralizing these potentially harmful substances, antioxidants may, theoretically, improve health and slow down the aging process. Read more ..


The Robotic Edge

In the Future, Robots May Develop as Does Nature

January 24th 2011

Science - Lego robots

Want to build a really tough robot? Forget about Terminator. Instead, watch a tadpole turn into a frog.

Or at least that’s not too far off from what University of Vermont roboticist Josh Bongard has discovered.

In a first-of-its-kind experiment, Bongard created both simulated and actual robots that, like tadpoles becoming frogs, change their body forms while learning how to walk. And, over generations, his simulated robots also evolved, spending less time in “infant” tadpole-like forms and more time in “adult” four-legged forms. Read more ..


The Pre-Historic Edge

New Discovery in China Allows Scientists to Differentiate Male and Female Flying Dinosaurs

January 24th 2011

Science - Quetzalcoatlus mates
Female Pterodactyl (l), Male Pterodactyl (r)

The discovery of an ancient fossil, nicknamed 'Mrs. T', has allowed scientists for the first time to sex pterodactyls – flying reptiles that lived alongside dinosaurs between 220-65 million years ago. Pterodactyls featured prominently in Steven Spielberg's movie Jurassic Park III and are a classic feature of many dinosaur movies where they are often depicted as giant flying reptiles with a crest. The discovery of a flying reptile fossilized together with an egg in Jurassic rocks (about 160 million years old) in China provides the first direct evidence for gender in these extinct fliers. This fossil shows that females were crestless, solving the long-standing problem of what some pterosaurs did with their spectacular head crests: showy displays by males. According to a news release, the find was made by an international team of researchers from the University of Leicester and the University of Lincoln in the UK, as well as the Geological Institute of Beijing. Read more ..


The Race for Solar

Nature Shows how Moth Eyes Increase the Efficiency of Photovoltaics

January 24th 2011

Animals - Moth

The eyes of moths, which allow them to see well at night, are also covered with a water-repellent, anti-reflective coating that makes their eyes among the least reflective surfaces in nature and helps them hide from predators in the dark. Mimicking the moth eye's microstructure, a team of researchers in Japan has created a new film, suitable for mass-production, for covering solar cells that can cut down on the amount of reflected light and help capture more power from the sun. Read more ..


Edge on Pollution

Crucial Spanish Wetland Beset by Dangerous Heavy Metals and Pesticides

January 18th 2011

Environment Topics - Huelva wetlands pollution

According to the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology, the Estero de Domingo Rubio wetland, located near the Marismas del Odiel Natural Area in the Huelva estuary of the Odiel River in Andalucia, is regionally, nationally and internationally protected thanks to its ecological value. However, its tributary rivers and the Ría de Huelva estuary pump manmade pollutants into it, which could affect its water quality and ecosystem. The city of Huelva lies on Spain's Mediterranean shore between the Guadiana and Gualdalquivir rivers.

Industrial activity, accumulations of dangerous waste, the expansion of farming, and excessive extraction of sand and gravel for the construction industry are the leading threats to the Estero de Domingo Rubio wetland, the tidal system of which plays a "crucial" role in transporting and dispersing pollutants. Read more ..


The Anceint Edge

Scientists Find Evidence of the Oldest Vintner's Equipment Ever Discovered

January 18th 2011

Archaeology Topics - Bird Cave Armenia and wine press
Archaeologists observe ancient wine press

Analysis by a UCLA-led team of scientists has confirmed the discovery of the oldest complete wine production facility ever found, including grape seeds, withered grape vines, remains of pressed grapes, a rudimentary wine press, a clay vat apparently used for fermentation, wine-soaked potsherds, and even a cup and drinking bowl.
          
The facility, which dates back to roughly 4100 B.C. — 1,000 years before the earliest comparable find — was unearthed by a team of archaeologists from Armenia, the United States and Ireland in the same mysterious Armenian cave complex where an ancient leather shoe was found, a discovery that was announced last summer.
          
"For the first time, we have a complete archaeological picture of wine production dating back 6,100 years," said Gregory Areshian, co-director of the excavation and assistant director of UCLA's Cotsen Institute of Archaeology. Read more ..

Travel Safe

Radioactive Isotopes Developed by Government Scientists Sniff Luggage for Bombs

January 10th 2011

Energy Topics - Nickel isotope

When Transportation Security Administration (TSA) inspectors swipe a cloth over your luggage and then place it in an analyzer to check for explosives residue, they are using a device containing 63Ni, a radioactive isotope of nickel, made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee.

Oak Ridge is the exclusive producer for 63Ni in North America and perhaps worldwide. "Our only competition would probably be Russia. They have high-flux research reactors and may well be supplying the material also," explained Mitch Ferren in the ORNL Isotope Business Office. The office coordinates production of the 63Ni and other isotopes.

To detect explosives, or hazardous chemicals and vapors, an area of public safety increasingly important since the September 11 attacks, the 63Ni's beta emitter acts as an annihilation source, stripping the molecules that are given off by a material and analyzing these in the device.

To make 63Ni, technicians at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at HFIR prepare targets of enriched stable 62Niand then bombard them with neutrons in HFIR. Each target contains 25 grams of pressed 62Ni metal pellets stacked in a 35 inch long aluminum target capsule, 12.5 grams at each end. Under bombardment with neutrons, 62Ni becomes activated and the result is a new, radioactive isotope useful for airport and transportation security applications. The 62Ni comes from an inventory of stable isotopes maintained by ORNL's Isotope Development Group. Read more ..


The Race for Alt Fuel

Power Plant: Algae as an Alternative Energy Source

January 10th 2011

Energy Topics - algae

Prof. Avihai Danon of the Weizmann Institute of Science’s Department of Plant Sciences has been working with algae—simple, photosynthetic life forms that can be found all over the world—for more than 20 years. Algae are diverse, having many thousands of species, and adaptive, thriving in a variety of conditions; these attributes can teach scientists a lot and make algae, as Prof. Danon says, “a great model system to study.” For example, in his research focusing on how they adapt to sunlight, Prof. Danon found that there is a very sophisticated level of regulation inside algae. “On the one hand, the plant utilizes sunlight for energy production through photosynthesis,” a process that, while beneficial, must be very carefully calibrated because “on the other hand, it can kill the plant in seconds,” he says. He likes to compare a plant’s ability to perform photosynthesis to having an atomic reactor in your stomach: the reactor can provide you with free energy, but if it’s not tightly controlled, then it can melt down. Read more ..


The Race for Biofuels

Biofuel Grasslands Better for Birds than Ethanol Staple Corn

January 10th 2011

Energy / Environment - Biofuel field

Developing biofuel from native perennials instead of corn in the Midwest’s rolling grasslands would better protect threatened bird populations, Michigan State University research suggests.

Federal mandates and market forces both are expected to promote rising biofuel production, MSU biologist Bruce Robertson says, but the environmental consequences of turning more acreage over to row crops for fuel are a serious concern.

Ethanol in America is chiefly made from corn, but research is focusing on how to cost-effectively process cellulosic sources such as wood, corn stalks and grasses. Perennial grasses promise low cost and energy inputs—planting, fertilizing, watering—and the new study quantifies substantial environmental benefits.

“Native perennial grasses might provide an opportunity to produce biomass in ways that are compatible with the conservation of biodiversity and important ecosystem services such as pest control,” Robertson said. “This work demonstrates that next-generation biofuel crops have potential to provide a new source of habitat for a threatened group of birds.” With its rich variety of ecosystems, including historic prairie, southern Michigan provided a convenient place to compare bird populations in 20 sites of varying size for each of the three fuel feedstocks. Grassland birds are of special concern, Robertson said, having suffered more dramatic population losses than any other group of North American birds. Read more ..


The Race for Alt-Fuel

Newly Bio-Engineered Yeast May Overcome Cellulosic Biofuel Production Obstacles

January 3rd 2011

Science - Funky Yeast stuff

A newly engineered yeast strain can simultaneously consume two types of sugar from plants to produce ethanol, researchers report.

The sugars are glucose, a six-carbon sugar that is relatively easy to ferment; and xylose, a five-carbon sugar that has been much more difficult to utilize in ethanol production. The new strain, made by combining, optimizing and adding to earlier advances, reduces or eliminates several major inefficiencies associated with current biofuel production methods. The findings, from a collaborative led by researchers at the University of Illinois, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of California and the energy company BP, are described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read more ..


Edge on Anthropology

Is Israel The Birthplace of Modern Human Beings?

January 3rd 2011

Archaeology Topics - Early tooth found in Israel

While it has long been believed that modern man emerged from the continent of Africa 200,000 years ago, Tel Aviv University archaeologists have uncovered evidence that Homo sapiens roamed the land now called Israel as early as 400,000 years ago — the earliest evidence for the existence of modern man anywhere in the world.

The findings were discovered in the Qesem Cave, a pre-historic site located near Rosh Ha'ayin that was first excavated in 2000. Professor Avi Gopher and Dr. Ran Barkai of Tel Aviv University's Department of Archaeology, as well as Professor Israel Hershkowitz of the university's Department of Anatomy and Anthropology and Sackler School of Medicine and an international team of scientists, performed a morphological analysis on eight human teeth found there. This analysis, which included CT scans and X-rays, indicates that the size and shape of the teeth are very similar to those of modern man. The teeth found in the Qesem Cave are very similar to other evidence of modern man from Israel, dated to around 100,000 years ago, discovered in the Skhul Cave in the Carmel and Qafzeh Cave in the Lower Galilee near Nazareth. Read more ..


Edge of Space

Astronomers Find that the Most Massive Stars are Born in Near Isolation

December 27th 2010

Science - Star view

New observations by University of Michigan astronomers add weight to the theory that the most massive stars in the universe could form essentially anywhere, including in near isolation; they don't need a large stellar cluster nursery.

This is the most detailed observational study to date of massive stars that appear (from the ground) to be alone. The scientists used the Hubble Space Telescope to zoom in on eight of these giants, which range from 20 to 150 times as massive as the Sun. The stars they looked at are in the Small Magellanic Cloud, a dwarf galaxy that's one of the Milky Way's nearest neighbors. Their results, published in the Dec. 20 edition of the Astrophysical Journal, show that five of the stars had no neighbors large enough for Hubble to discern. The remaining three appeared to be in tiny clusters of ten or fewer stars. Doctoral student Joel Lamb and associate professor Sally Oey, both in the Department of Astronomy, explained the significance of their findings in a paper entitled "The Sparsest Cluster with O Stars." Read more ..


The Prehistoric Edge

Fossil Finger Bone Yields Genome of a Previously Unknown Human Relative

December 27th 2010

Archaeology Topics - Denisovan cave dig

A 30,000-year-old finger bone found in a cave in southern Siberia came from a young girl who was neither an early modern human nor a Neanderthal, but belonged to a previously unknown group of human relatives who may have lived throughout much of Asia during the late Pleistocene epoch. Although the fossil evidence consists of just a bone fragment and one tooth, DNA extracted from the bone has yielded a draft genome sequence, enabling scientists to reach some startling conclusions about this extinct branch of the human family tree, called “Denisovans” after the cave where the fossils were found.

These were the findings of an international team of scientists, including many of the same researchers who earlier this year published the Neanderthal genome. Richard Green of the University of California, Santa Cruz, played a lead role in the analysis of the genome sequence data, for which a special portal was designed on the UCSC Genome Browser. The team was led by Svante Pääbo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. Read more ..


The Prehistoric Edge

Dead Sea Drilling Project To Chart Human History in the Region

December 27th 2010

Israel Topics - Dead Sea drilling

About 50 miles from Bethlehem, a drilling project is determining the climate and earthquake activity of the region of Israel. Scientists from eight nations are examining the samples taken from beneath the Dead Sea, after drilling a borehole in this deepest basin in the world. The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) brings together research teams from Israel, Japan, Norway, Switzerland, the U.S. and Germany. Researchers were also drawn from Jordan and areas under the control of the Palestinian Authority. 

Scientists and technicians of the GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences have now completed a geophysical measurement procedure in the hole and helped with the initial examination of the cores in a field laboratory. According to a statement, “We have drilled through about half a million years of sedimentary deposits,” estimates Dr. Ulrich Harms from the ICDP’s operational support group at the GFZ. “From this, we can deduce not only the climate history, but also the earthquake activity in this seismically very active region.” The direction and inclination of the well were determined with high precision below the Dead Sea, which is around 1000 feet deep at the site of drilling rig, while the physical properties of the rocks were measured down to the bottom of the 1500-foot deep bore hole. Read more ..


Edge on Global Warming

Israeli Scientists Digging Deep into Mankind’s Origins and Climate Change

December 27th 2010

Israel Topics - Zvi ben-Avraham
Prof. Zvi Ben-Avraham

Israeli researchers are drilling through four ice ages, epic sandstorms, mankind’s migration from Africa to the New World, and the biggest droughts in history. Tel Aviv University is heading an international study that for the first time will dig deep beneath the Dead Sea, about a third of a mile down under the ground and about a fifth of a mile under water. Drilling with a special rig, the researchers will look back in time to collect a massive amount of information about climate change and earthquake patterns.

The study is led by Professor Zvi Ben-Avraham of Tel Aviv University’s Minerva Dead Sea Research Center. Said Ben-Avraham, it “aims to get a complete record in unprecedented resolution—at one year intervals—of the last 500 thousand years,” says Prof. Ben-Avraham.

Looking at the core sample to be dug about five miles offshore near Ein Gedi, Israel, the researchers hope to pinpoint particular years in Earth’s history to discover the planet’s condition. They hope to find out what the climate was like 365,250 years ago, for instance, or determine the year of a catastrophic earthquake. Read more ..


Sleep on the Edge

Getting Ahead of the High Price of Sleep Disorders

December 21st 2010

Social Topics - Narcolepsy

Danish sleep researchers at the University of Copenhagen and the Danish Institute for Health Services Research have examined the socio-economic consequences of the sleep disorder hypersomnia in one of the largest studies of its kind.

The sleep disorder has far-reaching consequences for both the individual and society as a whole.

Hypersomnia is characterized by excessive tiredness during the day. Patients who suffer from the disorder are extremely sleepy and need to take a nap several times a day. This can occur both at work, during a meal, in the middle of a conversation or behind the steering wheel. Hypersomnia is often a symptom of sleep disorders such as narcolepsy, sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, violent snoring and/or obesity-related breathing difficulties," explains Professor of Clinical Neurophysiology Poul Jennum from the Center for Healthy Aging at the University of Copenhagen. The professor also leads the Danish Center for Sleep Medicine at Glostrup Hospital, which each year treats patients from across the country. Read more ..


Edge on Global Warming

Ancient Reptile Extinctions Give Glimpse of Response to Human-caused Climate Change

December 21st 2010

Environment Topics - Lizard bowl

A wave of reptile extinctions on the Greek islands over the past 15,000 years may offer a preview of the way plants and animals will respond as the world rapidly warms due to human-caused climate change, according to a University of Michigan ecologist and his colleagues.

The Greek island extinctions also highlight the critical importance of preserving habitat corridors that will enable plants and animals to migrate in response to climate change, thereby maximizing their chances of survival.

As the climate warmed at the tail end of the last ice age, sea levels rose and formed scores of Aegean islands that had formerly been part of the Greek mainland. At the same time, cool and moist forested areas dwindled as aridity spread through the region. In response to the combined effects of a shifting climate, vegetation changes and ever-decreasing island size, many reptile populations perished. Read more ..


The Deep Edge

Big-Mouth Blue Whales are Super-Efficient Foragers

December 13th 2010

Energy / Environment - Blue whale

Blue whales eat 90 times more energy when diving than they use, thanks to big mouths. Diving blue whales can dive for anything up to 15 minutes. However, Bob Shadwick from the University of British Columbia, Canada, explains that blue whales may be able to dive for longer, because of the colossal oxygen supplies they could carry in their blood and muscles, so why don't they? 'The theory was that what they are doing under water must use a lot of energy,' says Shadwick. Explaining that the whales feed by lunging repeatedly through deep shoals of krill, engulfing their own body weight in water before filtering out the nutritious crustaceans, Shadwick says, "It was thought that the huge drag effect when they feed and reaccelerate this gigantic body must be the cost." Read more ..


The Genetic Edge

Plant Disease Genome that Acts like Stealth Bomber of Plant Pathogens

December 13th 2010

Science - Funky spore

Research led by the University of Warwick and The Sainsbury Laboratory of the United Kingdom, in collaboration with Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), has sequenced the genome of a plant disease-causing organism revealing that it acts like a "stealth bomber of plant pathogens." The research has uncovered the tactics used to sneak past the plant's immune defenses. That same discovery also provides tools for researchers to identify the components of the plant immune system and devise new ways to prevent disease.

The research looked at an obligate biotroph, a type of plant pathogen which has adapted so exquisitely to its host that it extracts nutrients only from living plant tissue and cannot grow away for their plant. While the organism may once have been able to exist by itself it has now evolved in such a way that it cannot survive without a host plant and usually that has to be a very specific type of host plant. Read more ..


Edge on Environment

Pennsylvania's Iron-Smelting History Leaves Traces in its Soils

December 13th 2010

Science - PA State soil sampling
Pennsylvania researchers check soil samples

Iron furnaces that once dotted central Pennsylvania may have left a legacy of manganese enriched soils, according to Penn State geoscientists. This manganese can be toxic to trees, especially sugar maples, and other vegetation.

The research, which quantified the amounts of manganese in soil core samples, was part of work done at the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory funded by the National Science Foundation.

"Our group's focus was to study the soil chemistry," said Elizabeth M. Herndon, graduate student in geosciences. "We saw excess manganese in the soil and decided that we needed to quantify the manganese and determine where it came from." Read more ..


Health Edge

Research Shows that Cleaniless, Rather than Godliness, is Next to Sickness

December 6th 2010

Environment Topics - Triclosan

Young people who are overexposed to antibacterial soaps containing triclosan may suffer more allergies, and exposure to higher levels of Bisphenol A among adults may negatively influence the immune system, a new University of Michigan School of Public Health study suggests. The paper is titled, “The Impact of Bisphenol A and Triclosan on Immune Parameters in the U.S. Population.”

Triclosan is a chemical compound widely used in products such as antibacterial soaps, toothpaste, pens, diaper bags and medical devices. Bisphenol A (BPA) is found in many plastics and, for example, as a protective lining in food cans. Both of these chemicals are in a class of environmental toxicants called endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), which are believed to negatively impact human health by mimicking or affecting hormones. Read more ..


Edge on Environment

Understanding How Icebergs Form May Lead to Better Forecasts of Global Warming

December 6th 2010

Environment Topics - Glacier calving
Edge of Antarctic glacier calves into the sea

In an effort to understand how fast sea level could rise as the climate warms, a University of Michigan researcher has developed a new theory to describe how icebergs detach from ice sheets and glaciers. This process of "iceberg calving" isn't well understood.

While scientists believe it currently accounts for roughly half of the mass lost in shrinking ice sheets, current sea level rise models don't take changes in iceberg calving into account in their predictions, says Jeremy Bassis, an assistant professor in the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences at the institution based in Ann Arbor MI. "Our models cannot predict about half of the mass balance. We don't know how much of an effect this will have, but we've seen several prominent examples where calving is connected with speed-up of the ice-retreat process," Bassis said. The Larsen B ice shelf in Antarctica—a 2,000-square-mile, 700-foot-thick slab that had been stable for thousands of years—disintegrated in about six weeks between January and March of 2002. Read more ..


The Edge of Space

Massive Galaxies Emerged at Onset of the Universe

November 29th 2010

Science - Young Galaxy NASA

Some of the universe's most massive galaxies may have formed billions of years earlier than current scientific models predict, according to surprising new research led by Tufts University. "We have found a relatively large number of very massive, highly luminous galaxies that existed almost 12 billion years ago when the universe was still very young, about 1.5 billion years old. These results appear to disagree with the latest predictions from models of galaxy formation and evolution," said Tufts astrophysicist Danilo Marchesini, assistant professor of physics and astronomy at the Tufts School of Arts and Sciences. "Current understanding of the physical processes responsible in forming such massive galaxies has difficulty reproducing these observations." Read more ..

China on the Edge

Google Attacked by China, Documents Suggest

November 29th 2010

China Topics - Chinese hackers

The massive hacking Google faced in China, first revealed in January, may have been an attack by Chinese government operatives, according to information revealed by Wikileaks.

Among the the more than 200,000 documents released by Wikileaks, one suggests a connection between the Chinese government and the Google hacking, which led the company to threaten to pull its operations from China.

The New York Times, in its coverage of the Wikileaks documents, reports that China’s Politburo may have directed the hacking. A Chinese contact who spoke with the American Embassy said as much in Beijing in January, one cable reveals. Read more ..



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